Linnworks | Synchronising the ecommerce world

Ecommerce Graveyard: How 43 Popular Websites Used To Look

Written by Danny Asling | May 16, 2017

The internet has forever changed the way we buy and sell goods and services. Since 1994, we started out buying wine, chocolates, flowers amongst other popular impulse items online.

Many of the ecommerce designs in the 90s were simplistic, difficult to use, and damn right ugly. However, at the time they were cutting edge and started an ecommerce revolution that would forever change the way we buy online.

In the summer of 1995, Jeff Bezos boxed up the first ever book sold on Amazon from his Seattle garage. Within 30 days of business, "Earth's largest bookstore" went on to sell books to online shoppers in all 50 U.S. states, and 45 countries. Bezos had tapped into a powerful new e-commerce market, and others would soon follow in his footsteps.

In this fascinating archive, we look at what 43 popular ecommerce websites used to look like in the 1990s and early 2000s. Scroll down to see some great examples from the likes of Nike, Zazzle, Lego, and many more.

This is the ecommerce graveyard.

1. Nike - 1998

2. Amazon - 2001

3. Sony - 1999

4. Samsung - 1999

5. AOL - 1997

6. McDonald's - 1999

7. Ebay - 1999

8. Staples - 1999

9. Barnes & Noble - 1999

10. CD Baby - 1999

11. Ancestry - 1999

12. Play.com - 2004

13. Domino's Pizza - 2003

14. Dell - 1996

15. Google - 1997

16. Gap - 1997

17. KFC - 1999

18. Zazzle - 2004

19. Thorntons - 2000

20. Pizza Hut - 2002

21. Heineken - 1997

22. Tesco - 2000

23. Sainsburys - 2000

24. WHSmith - 2000

25. Coca Cola - 1999

26. Ryman - 2002

27. Blockbuster - 2000

28. Expedia - 1998

29. Carphone Warehouse - 2003

30. Microsoft - 2000

31. Hewlett Packard - 1998

32. Lego - 1996

33. Apple - 1997

34. Nestle - 1999

35. Nokia - 1999

36. Budweiser - 1996

37. Pepsi - 1996

38. Lowe's - 1996

39. Disney - 1996

40. Wal-Mart - 2000

41. Netflix - 2008

42. Mars - 1996

43. Gatorade - 1996

All screenshots are courtesy of Internet Archive's Wayback Machine.

Do you have any other examples? Let us know in the comments below.